The Teabo Manuscript Maya Christian Copybooks Chilam Balams and Native Text Production in Yucat n

by Mark Z. Christensen

The Teabo Manuscript Maya Christian Copybooks Chilam Balams and Native Text Production in Yucat n Winner LASA Mexico Humanities Book Prize 2017

Publisher : University of Texas Press

Author : Mark Z. Christensen

ISBN : 9781477310816

Year : 2016

Language: en

File Size : 95.7 MB

Category : Literature Fiction

THE

TEABO
MANUSCRIPT

THE LINDA SCHELE SERIES IN
MAYA AND PRE-­C OLUMBIAN STUDIES

THE

TEABO
MANUSCRIPT

Maya Christian
Copybooks, Chilam
Balams, and Native Text
Production in Yucatan

MARK Z.
CHRISTENSEN

University of Texas Press, Austin

Copyright © 2016 by the University of Texas Press
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
First edition, 2016
Requests for permission to reproduce material from this work should be sent to:
Permissions
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P.O. Box 7819
Austin, TX 78713-­7819
http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/rp-­form
♾ The paper used in this book meets the minimum requirements of ANSI/NISO
Z39.48-­1992 (R1997) (Permanence of Paper).
Design by Kimberly Glyder
Library of Congress Cataloging-­in-­Publication Data
Christensen, Mark Z., author.
The Teabo manuscript : Maya Christian copybooks, Chilam Balams, and native text
production in Yucatan / Mark Z. Christensen.
First edition. | Austin : University of Texas Press, 2016.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
LCCN 2015049526
ISBN 978-­1-­4773-­1081-­6 (cloth : alk. paper)
ISBN 978-­1-­4773-­1082-­3 (library e-­book)
ISBN 978-­1-­4773-­1083-­0 (non-­library e-­book)
LCSH: Chilam Balam de Teabo (Manuscript) | Manuscripts, Maya. | Mayas—Religion. |
Christianity and culture—Mexico—History. | Mayas—Medicine—Early works to 1800.
LCC F1435.3.R3 C47 2016 | DDC 299.7/842—dc23
LC record available at http://lccn.loc.gov/2015049526
doi:10.7560/310816

TO CARTER
who if he found a Maya
manuscript would simply
roll it up and use
it as a sword

CONTENTS
Maps and Figures • ix
Tables • xi
Acknowledgments • xiii
Conventions of Transcription and Translation • xv

INT RODUCT ION

Colonial Texts and Maya Christian Copybooks • 1
CH APT E R 1

Creating the Creation • 25
CH APT ER 2

Genealogies, Parables, and the Final Judgment • 103
CH APT E R 3

Doomsday and the Maya • 137
CH APT E R 4

Mary, Christ, and the Pope • 173
CH APT ER 5

Records of Death and Healing • 191
Conclusion • 213
Appendix: The Teabo Manuscript • 218
Notes • 263
Selected Bibliography • 301
Index • 315

Maps and Figures
Map 0.1 Hieroglyphic and Alphabetic Maya Texts Confiscated,
1560–1750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Map 0.2 Towns Where Extant Books of Chilam
Balam Were Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Fig. 0.1 Entry of Unknown Author in the Teabo Manuscript . . . . . . . 20
Fig. 0.2 Entry of Baltasar Mutul in the Passion Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Fig. 1.1 Spherical Model of the Universe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Fig. 1.2 Michelangelo Caetani’s Diagram of Dante’s
Layered Cosmos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Fig. 2.1 Genealogical Text of Pedro Chan and Juana May . . . . . . . . 107
Fig. 2.2 Jacob Isaacsz van Swanenburgh (1571–1638),
The Harrowing of Hell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Fig. 2.3 Albrecht DĂĽrer, The Last Judgment, 1510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Fig. 3.1 Fresco Portrait of St. Jerome, Teabo, 1650s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Fig. 5.1 Examples of 1875 Entries from the Na and
Passion Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Fig. 5.2 Examples of 1873 Entries from the Na and
“Yucatec Prayers” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197

Tables
Table 0.1 Examples of Maya Christian Copybooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Table 0.2 Known Maya Texts from Teabo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Table 1.1 Cognate Passages of the Genesis Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Table 3.1 The Fifteen Signs in Peter Damian’s De novissimis
et Antichristo (Eleventh Century) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Table 3.2 The Fifteen Signs in Peter Comestor’s Historia
scholastica (Twelfth Century) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Table 3.3 The Fifteen Signs in Jacobus de Voragine’s
The Golden Legend (1260s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Table 3.4 The Fifteen Signs in Thomas Aquinas’s Summa
theologica (Thirteenth Century) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Table 3.5 The Fifteen Signs in the Flos sanctorum
(Fifteenth Century) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Table 3.6 The Fifteen Signs in Bautista’s 1606 Sermonario . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Table 3.7 The Fifteen Signs in Anunciación’s 1577 Sermonario . . . . . . . 147
Table 3.8 The Fifteen Signs in “de Judicio Finali” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Table 3.9 The Fifteen Signs in the Tusik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Table 3.10 The Fifteen Signs in the “Maya Sermons” Text . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Table 3.11 The Fifteen Signs in the Teabo Manuscript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Table 3.12 The Fifteen Signs in the Morley Manuscript . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Table 3.13 Maya Texts Containing The Fifteen Signs and
Its Accompanying Discourses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Table 5.1 Copybooks from Teabo and Their Death Records . . . . . . . . 195
Table 6.1 Cognate Passages among Maya Religious Texts . . . . . . . . . . 216

Acknowledgments

F

or many years now, Matthew Restall has encouraged and supported
my work, and this project has benefited greatly from his guidance and
scholarly influence. I still consider myself fortunate to have been his
student. John F. Chuchiak also deserves my most heartfelt thanks. His expertise in Maya manuscripts and Church history, particularly in Yucatan,
opened new insights and challenged me to see the Teabo Manuscript in new
ways, and I am profoundly grateful. When I came across particularly puzzling
words and passages, David Bolles proved most generous with his time and
talents in the translation of Yucatec Maya, and I am grateful. Finally, Victoria
Bricker and Timothy Knowlton provided their time and expertise whenever
I had questions or was in need of other scholarly opinions.
Of course, many deserve my sincere appreciation for both their scholarship that paved the way and their assistance through various conversations,
emails, and advice. My thanks in particular to Louise Burkhart, Fr. Roger
Corriveau, Jaime Lara, Brian Murdoch, Michel Oudijk, Stafford Poole,
C.M., Frauke Sachse, Sabine Dedenbach-­Salazar Saenz, Amara Solari, and
David Tavárez. A few existing works include discussions and translations of
various versions of the Genesis Commentary and other texts that proved
helpful in my own translation process. I am particularly grateful for Victoria
Bricker and Helga-­Maria Miram’s work on the Kaua, and Gretchen Whalen’s
work on the Morley Manuscript. Moreover, portions of this book benefited
from the comments of those attending the 2013 roundtable at the Käte Hamburger Kolleg at the Center for Religious Studies, Ruhr-­Universität. I also
am indebted to the staff at Brigham Young University’s L. Tom Perry Special
Collections, including Cindy Brightenburg, Kohleen Jones, and Russ Taylor,
for their assistance and the generosity of the library for allowing a full reproduction of the text. This project has also benefited from the financial support
of the National Endowment for the Humanities and Assumption College.
As always, the largest debt is held by those most close: my family. My
wife is always willing to listen to me ramble on about translations and new
ideas for the book, and my kids help me to smile and laugh after long days
in front of a computer. I could not have asked for a more beautiful family.

acknowledgments ✢

xiii

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